Research

Falls prevention in residential care homes: a randomised controlled trial


Reference:

Dyer, C. A. E., Taylor, G. J., Reed, M., Dyer, C. A., Robertson, D. R. and Harrington, R., 2004. Falls prevention in residential care homes: a randomised controlled trial. Age and Ageing, 33 (6), pp. 596-602.

Related documents:

This repository does not currently have the full-text of this item.
You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided below.

Abstract

Objective: to determine the effect of risk factor modification and balance exercise on falls rates in residential care homes. Design: cluster randomised controlled trial. Participants: 196 residents (aged 60 years or over) in 20 residential care homes were enrolled (38% response rate). Homes were randomly allocated to intervention and control arms. A total of 102 residents were consigned to the intervention arm and 94 to the control arm. Intervention: a multifactorial falls prevention programme including 3 months gait and balance training, medication review, podiatry and optometry. Main outcome measures: number of falls/recurrent falls per person, number of medications per person, and change in Tinetti gait and balance measure. Results: in the intervention group there was a mean of 2.2 falls per resident per year compared with 4.0 in the control group; this failed to reach statistical significance (P = 0.2) once the intra-cluster correlation (ICC, 0.10) had been accounted for. Several risk factors were reduced in the intervention arm. Conclusions: falls risk factor reduction is possible in residents of care homes. A modest reduction in falls rates was demonstrated but this failed to reach statistical significance.

Details

Item Type Articles
CreatorsDyer, C. A. E., Taylor, G. J., Reed, M., Dyer, C. A., Robertson, D. R. and Harrington, R.
DOI10.1093/ageing/afh204
DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Health
RefereedYes
StatusPublished
ID Code6661
Additional InformationID number: ISI:000224798200014

Export

Actions (login required)

View Item