Research

Pain in cognitively impaired, non-communicating children


Reference:

Stallard, P., Williams, L., Lenton, S. and Velleman, R., 2001. Pain in cognitively impaired, non-communicating children. Archives of Disease in Childhood, 85 (6), pp. 460-462.

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Abstract

Aim-To detail the everyday occurrence of pain in non-communicating children with cognitive impairment. Methods-Thirty four parents of cognitively impaired verbally non-communicating children completed pain diaries over a two week period. Each day, for five defined periods, parents rated whether their child had been in pain, and if so, its severity and duration. Results-Twenty five (73.5%) children experienced pain on at least one day, with moderate or severe levels of pain being experienced by 23 (67.6%). Four children (11.7%) experienced moderate or severe pain lasting longer than 30 minutes on five or more days. No child was receiving active pain management. Conclusions-Everyday pain in children with severe cognitive impairment is common, yet is rarely actively treated.

Details

Item Type Articles
CreatorsStallard, P., Williams, L., Lenton, S. and Velleman, R.
DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Health
Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Psychology
RefereedYes
StatusPublished
ID Code6859
Additional InformationID number: ISI:000172446200006

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