Research

Confidence or competence: do presidencies matter for households' subjective preferences?


Reference:

Easaw, J. Z. and Ghoshray, A., 2007. Confidence or competence: do presidencies matter for households' subjective preferences? European Journal of Political Economy, 23 (4), pp. 1025-1037.

Related documents:

This repository does not currently have the full-text of this item.
You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided below.

Abstract

This paper investigates how households form subjective preferences. We examine the relationship between subjective economic confidence or sentiments and the perception of the incumbent government's competence, and consider how preferences affect each other. We further consider consequences of different presidencies. A theoretical model shows how households 'anchor' subjective views of the incumbent's competence on the household's confidence. Empirical analysis confirms the posited behavior and confirms that different presidencies have a bearing on the relationship.

Details

Item Type Articles
CreatorsEasaw, J. Z.and Ghoshray, A.
Uncontrolled Keywordsrent-seeking, and performance of government (h110), and voting behavior (d720), elections, empirical analysis (d120), structure, models of political processes, legislatures, consumer economics, scope
DepartmentsFaculty of Humanities & Social Sciences > Economics
RefereedYes
StatusPublished
ID Code9796

Export

Actions (login required)

View Item